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Summer Reading Program 2013

While the reasons to read a particular book/article may vary from one reader to another, the benefits of independent leisure reading cannot be overstated. You may read for pleasure, to learn about other people or different ways of life, another era, a different perspective, to inform an opinion, to maintain and develop skills in a foreign language, to enhance your vocabulary, to foster critical thinking skills. By reading actively and thoughtfully, you can participate in the exchange that takes place among readers and writers across the centuries.

Summer vacation provides the time for this endeavor, and we hope you anticipate making reading part of your break from the rigors of the school year. The books/articles required for your summer reading are listed below by grades. Please purchase the books so you can mark them as you read. You can purchase them online at Follett Books (starting June 3). If you purchase your book elsewhere, make sure it is the same edition being sold through Follett. Articles for Social Studies are available as PDF documents. Note that each department has indicated expectations for how you should approach this assignment and what you will be expected to bring with you in September (see below for details). To preserve the integrity of the assignment, remember you are responsible for the reading of the books as listed—not someone else’s review, summary, or guide. Let these books/articles be the beginning of what you will read this summer.

General Guidelines

  • Students are expected to complete all assigned reading prior to beginning classes in September.
  • Students are required to meet the guidelines set by each academic department (i.e. English, Social Studies, and World Language) as outlined below. Any written work required by an academic department is outlined in the information below. Students should complete this work prior to beginning classes.
  • Social Study Readings are articles that can be downloaded from this site by clicking on the title.
  • Advanced Placement students may have different reading and assignments given by their instructor. The instructor will make those students aware of their requirements for summer work.
  • Questions about the program should be directed to:
 

For incoming freshmen and sophomores:

Brother Raymond Hoyt, CFX, Assistant Principal for Academics, Grades 9&10

For incoming juniors and  seniors:

Mr. Stephen Dacey, Assistant Principal for Aacademics, Grades 11&12

Brother Raymond and Mr. Dacey can be reached at Xaverian 781.326.6392.

Incoming Freshmen Reading List

All incoming freshmen will be required to read two books this summer, one for English, one for Social Studies. If you are enrolled in Chinese II, French II or Spanish II, you will be required to read an additional book.

 

Students in English I – Honors will read 1984 by Orwell.

Students in English I – Accelerated and College Prep will read Fahrenheit 451 by Bradbury.

Students in Chinese II – Honors will refer to this document 

Students in French II – Honors will read Un Été pas comme les autres.

Students in Spanish II – Honors will read La gran aventura de Alejandro.

Students in Human Geography – Honors will read The Waldseemüller Map: Charting the New World (click article to download)

Students in Human Geography – Accelerated will read Wonders and Whoppers (click article to download)

Students in Human Geography – College Prep will read The Culture of Being Rude (click article to download)

Incoming Sophomore Reading List

All incoming sophomores have required summer reading for English, Social Studies, and World Language. If a student is enrolled in an Advanced Placement United States History I, the student will receive the reading assignment from the teacher.

 

Students in English II – Honors, Accelerated, and College Prep will read A Separate Peace by Knowles.

Students in Chinese II – Honors will refer to this document.

Students in Chinese II- Accelerated will refer to this document.

Students in Chinese III – Honors will refer to this document.

Students in French II – Honors will read Un Été pas comme les autres.

Students in French II – Accelerated will read Chapters 1 – 12 in Un Été pas comme les autres.

Students in French III – Honors will read Tistou - les pouces verts.

Students in French III – Accelerated will read Tistou - les pouces verts.

Students in Spanish II – Honors will read La gran aventura de Alejandro.

Students in Spanish II – Accelerated will read Chapters 1 -15 in La gran aventura de Alejandro.

Students in Spanish II – CP will read Chapers 1-10 in La gran aventura de Alejandro.

Students in Spanish III – Honors will read Chapters 1 – 15 in Momentos Hispanos.

Students in Spanish III – Accelerated will read Chapters 1 – 10 in Momentos Hispanos.

Students in US History to 1900 – Honors, Accelerated and College Prep will read Columbus’ Confusion About the New World and Pilgrims’ Progress (click articles to download)

Incoming Junior Reading List

All incoming juniors have required summer reading for English and Social Studies. If you are enrolled in a World Language course, you have additional summer reading. If a student is enrolled in an Advanced Placement Course which requires summer reading, the student will receive the reading assignment from the teacher.

 

Students in English III – Honors will read Old School by Wolff.

Students in English III – Accelerated will read Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer.

Students in Chinese III – Honors will refer to this document.

Students in French III – Honors will read Tistou - les pouces verts.

Students in French III – Accelerated will read Tistou - les pouces verts.

Students in French IV – Honors will read the following selections from En Bonne Forme (8th ed – 2007)

  1. Un beau dimanche à la campagne p. 441-442
  2. Un père inflexible p. 196-197
  3. L’étoile jaune p. 313-314

Students in Spanish III – Honors will read Chapters 1 – 15 in Momentos Hispanos.

Students in Spanish III – Accelerated will read Chapters 1 – 10 in Momentos Hispanos.

Students in Spanish IV – Honors will read the following selections from Abriendo Paso Lectura (2007)

  1. Cajas de cartón p. 75-80
  2. Un oso y un amor p. 44-46

Students in US and World History from 1900 – Honors and Accelerated will read Andrew Carnegie, Bosses and Machines and Wounded Knee Massacre (click articles to download)

Incoming Senior Reading List

All incoming seniors will be required to read one book for English this summer. If you are enrolled in a World Language course, you have additional summer reading. If a student is enrolled in an Advanced Placement Course which requires summer reading, the student will receive the reading assignment from the teacher.

 

Students in English IV – Honors will read The Remains of the Day by Ishiguro.

Students in English IV – Accelerated will read Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress by Sijie, Rilke (translator).

Students in French IV – Honors will read the following selections from En Bonne Forme (8th ed – 2007)

  1. Un beau dimanche à la campagne p. 441-442
  2. Un père inflexible p. 196-197
  3. L’étoile jaune p. 313-314

Students in Spanish IV – Honors will read the following selections from Abriendo Paso Lectura (2007)

  1. Cajas de cartón p. 75-80
  2. Un oso y un amor p. 44-46

English Department Summer Reading Guidelines

You will need to demonstrate your understanding of your summer reading when you return to school in the fall. The book you read will be integrated into the first academic term. You do not need to complete a written assignment over the summer. However, you are strongly encouraged to actively read your assigned book and use the guidelines below to take notes.

Most students will accomplish their reading over multiple reading sessions and be done with the reading long before they take the test on the reading assignment. Thus, it is essential that you keep notes on your reading. Good notes will be brief. To rewrite the book is counterproductive. The following is a guideline of things to note while you engage your summer reading.

I. Note factual information:

  1. Title
  2. Author
  3. Setting
    • A. Place.
    • B. Specific settings within the larger setting.
    • C. Time Period.
    • D. Passage of time within the book.
  4. Major Characters
  5. Minor Characters
  6. Narrative View Point (who tells the story)
  7. Plot Sequence (Basic overview of what happens from the beginning of the book until the end.)

Social Studies Department Summer Reading Guidelines

All freshmen, sophomores, and juniors (except for AP students) will be assigned articles to read over the summer. The articles that students read will be discussed in class and integrated into the first term’s curriculum. Students will be asked to “actively read” the assigned articles and bring them to class on the first day of school (instructions for how to “active read” are included below. In addition to actively reading the article, the first test of the year will include questions designed to evaluate the student’s comprehension of the articles.

Active Reading Instructions

When reading any assignment for the Xaverian Brothers Social Studies Department, please use the following format to take notes in the text.

  1. Write a key word or phrase at the top of each page highlighting the key information for that page. If the same information is appears for multiple pages, use an arrow (è) at the top of the page to connect the idea.
  2. Underline or highlight significant passages and information.
  3. Next to the underlined or highlighted passages, make a note in the margin indicating why the specific passage is important to note.
  4. Put a box around unknown vocabulary words and write the definitions nearby.
  5. Place a question mark (?) next to passages or sentences that are confusing or require explanation. Follow up with your teacher in class or in the center.
  6. Write a quick three sentence summary at the end of each assignment explaining the main ideas of the reading.
  7. Make notes and write questions in the margins of the text whenever it is appropriate or helpful.
  8. Example from Lois Lowry'sThe Giver 

World Language Department Summer Reading Guidelines

The cultural significance of the reading selections will be discussed in class.  Each reading selection has accompanying questions and/or exercises.  You are strongly encouraged to complete these questions and/or exercises in order to maintain your language skills over the summer.  This work would also serve as a beneficial resource in September.  You are not required to complete a written assignment during the summer however you will be asked to demonstrate your understanding of your summer reading during the first few days of classes with an in class assessment. 

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